Wotton Bridge Church

Wootton Bridge church

Wotton Bridge Church

The Church of St Edmund

Church Road, Wotton Bridge, Isle of Wight, PO33 4PZ
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 The parish church at Wootton Bridge is dedicated to Edmund, King of Norfolk from 855 AD, and Suffolk from 856 AD. He was overthrown by the Danes in 870 AD, and martyred when he refused to renounce his Christian Faith. A Saxon church, probably of timber construction, existed on the Wootton Bridge site at the time of the Domesday survey of 1086, and was replaced a year later in 1087 by a stone building, parts of which still survive today.
The featured picture above shows St Edmund’s church from the north-west. The north extensions are, a gabled Chapel of Remembrance dating from 1892 that was built on the site of a 14th century chantry chapel, and a late 20th century lean-to kitchen.
The first photograph in the gallery is of the splendid Norman south doorway. It has scalloped shafts, typical Norman chevron decorative moulding to the arch, and billets to the hood mould.
The second photograph is of the church interior looking east. The nave roof consists of  common rafter trusses, and the chancel has a barrel roof. The rood beam between the two is set on carved corbels and carries a modern sculpture of Christ.
Next shown is a section of the chancel roof which dates from the early 20th century. The painted decoration incorporates the medieval style monogram JHC for Jesus, and the emblem E for Edmund with arrows piercing a crown signifying the gruesome manner of his martyrdom in 870 AD when he was apparently tied to a tree and shot with arrows before being beheaded.
The fourth photograph is of the early 17th century pulpit with back panel and tester. It was restored in 1905. The font, shown in the last photograph in the gallery, is also Jacobean, standing on a Victorian base.
The other three photographs are of stained glass windows at St Edmund’s. First shown is the 3-light east window fitted in the 13th century chancel during the 14th century. The stained glass, depicting the crucifixion, was by Kempe and was installed in 1894. The second window is a lancet, also in the chancel, with Victorian glass depicting St Luke, and the third is a 2-light cinquefoil headed window with stained glass of St John and St Paul.
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